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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
couldn't breathe at points because of excitement and shock. >> the source was edward snowden. >> the nsa specifically targets the communications of everyone. it ingests them by default. it collects them in it's system and it filters them and it analyzes them and it measures them and it stores them. >> up to that point, the director of national intelligence, who oversees nearly 20 u.s. intelligence agencies, had been telling the public a different story. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. >> after the snowden revelations, clapper apologized, explaining that he'd given the "least untruthful" answer. >> i sitting at my desk certainly had the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal email. >> so everything from learning all your metadata, with whom you're speaking, who's emailing you, where you are when you do it, how long yo
by edward snowden. what he is now asking dpor -- asking for as washington tries to rebuild some relationships. >> it is vital when it comes to america safe and keeping our european allies safe. as i said earlier, the tensions that have been caused by these disclosures are ones that we acknowledge and ones we are addressing directly. >>> a check of the headlines. plans are in the work tips to prove the quality of life in the largest syrian refugee camp. it is home to more than 100,000 people that fled the civil war. they are swapping their squad cars for big rigs. the reason? by sitting up higher they have a chance of spotting drivers who are texting. >>> and there is going to be a partial solar eclipse visible to most of the east coast tomorrow at sunrise. get up early. it is a rare eclipse where the moon blocks part of the sun and completely in other parts of the world. >> obamacare was the focus of withering hearings this week over the website tee yeahs scow that put the white house on the defensive and em boldened the critics. >> the central issue here is not can we build a g
the name edward snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law and abusing it's power. >> suddenly in my
about the meeting with edward snowden and the letter to the government. edward snowden be willing to talk to german investigators or politicians or even come to germany to be interviewed? he could come to germany if it were guaranteed that he would be secure in germany or a comparable country. the green and the left party want to question snowden about u.s. surveillance activity. he could be offered asylum or safe passage in return. christian democrats it would exacerbate tensions with washington. one alternative being discussed is to meet with snowden in moscow. usif snowden was to provide with information, we will take that into consideration. verification or new information would be a good thing. -- not is nothing something the u.s. would be likely to find good. it reiterated its position on snowden on friday. which he iss with charged are serious. our view that the right thing to do is for him to return or be returned to the united states to face those charges. german government is in a tricky situation. how can they find out more about u.s. espionage without deepening the dip
's leaders. this after documents from edward snowden suggest that the u.s. was bugging angela merkel xfone -- angela merkel's a phone. they met to ask about the claims and edward snowden said he was willing to help the german government investigate. police in california have begun investigations into the shooting at los angeles airport that killed a security officer and disrupted more than 700 flights across the united states. the alleged shooter, a 27-year- old man stormed into a terminal, killing one officer and injuring at least three other people. the police shot and injured him before taking him into custody. police say he had more than 100 rounds of ammunition. back in the headlines as sectarian violence has claimed 7000 lives this year alone. the most violence they have seen since 2008. they are struggling to push back al qaeda. hase minister al-maliki called for more support from the united states. october was the bloodiest month in iraq in nine years, as 7000 people died in the strikes between sunni and shiite. the government of a rack cannot get the violence under control on thei
forward. for edward snowden, it's a fate he was willing to risk. >> you live a privileged life. you're living in hawaii, in paradise, and making a ton of money. what would it take to make you leave everything behind? the greatest fear that i have regarding the outcome for america, of these disclosures, is that nothing will change. >> i think what the nsa in our nation is trying to do is protect our people and other people. you know, i would say, do you speak arabic? >> do i? no. maafi mushkila kil shi tamam, alhamdulillah. and so from my perspective, we want to have a world where there are no problems, where everything is ok, and we can say thanks. so from our perspective, we have to work together as nations to do that, and it takes intelligence and the least intrusive way we could think of was metadata. if, if anyone has any ideas how they can do it better, let us know. >> but what price are people willing to pay for security? and what could mass surveillance do to the nature of american society, and its promises of democracy, liberty and privacy? >> if you allow the government, th
the powers of the nsa and edward snowden is now. offering to help germany. >> and president obama shook hands with the leader of iraq for the first time in two years. >> secretary of state john kerry is conceding that some u.s. spying has gone too far. kerry was speaking at a conference in london. he was defending the programs but the white house has concluded that reviews and changes are needed. >> in some cases i acknowledge as does the president some of these actions have reached too far and we are going to make sure that that doesn't happen in the future. >> lawmakers on capitol hill are taking up the spying being a at this times. the senate committee has limited how long the nsa can keep their data record. records. the bill will expand penalties for illegal spying. it falls short from real reform. >> one of the critics is journalist dplejournalist glen . the more information you collect about innocent people the harder it is to actually find the people that actually mean to do you harm. and the metaphor that surveillance officals use they are hooking for a needle in the hay stack. the la
.s. ambassadors protested the military move. >>> edward snowden wants the u.s. to stop treating him like a traitor. that's a letter he sent to german chancellor angela merkel. the former nsa contractor being recruited by germany as a witness into merkel's cell phone tap. >>> rebuilding after massive wildfires is a daunting task, but scientists are working on plants after wildfires. this is a report on seeds of success. >> reporter: when a wildfires ignites containment is the first priority. record high temperatures coupled with dry weather whipped up more than a dozen wildfires in colorado this summer. but what happens once the fire is extinguished could be the difference between it fueling more wildfires or preventing them. this is a site of the june 2012 pine ridge wildfire. >> it burned about 14,000 acres in the course of a few days. one day in particular. 10,000 acres burned. >> reporter: andrea is a conservation scientist with the chicago bow tannic garden. >> one problem is invasive species, but its run of the things that helped cause or carry this wildfire further than it otherwise. >> repo
into the servers of google and yahoo! according to edward snowden. he has found a new job. nice that the kid has found work. general alexander said it will be illegal for the nsa to break into any databases. what if they tap into underseas cable? and things like that. is that covered by the government oversight? >> the question is do we have a rogue agency in our hands or not? i am not sure. i accept the arguments they are doing all these things but this goes back to our previous discussion of who is minding the store. we have the director of national intelligence, what does he know and when did he know it and when did they tell the president they are eavesdropping on foreign leaders? why didn't he tell them or tell the president about the scope of the nsa activity if the director of intelligence really knew about this? you cannot keep the commander- in-chief in the dark on things like this. you cannot do it. >> there is a long tradition of plausible deniability. and not telling the top guy how you did it. at the same time, tremendous pressure to provide goodies. the morning briefing the a lot
were spying on allies and he thinks it is awful he should thank edward snowden for reviewing this. i think he owes edward snowden a little something. >> you do bring up snowden and baker you mentioned his name a couple times. what is going on here? why are we going to get him? >> here is the problem. this is a self-inflicted wound. if the president had done what you would have anticipated the commander-in-chief to do which is head to state to head of state and if he contacted the chinese authorities and said we want him back now, then i believe the chinese authorities with the right pressure -- it matters who delivers the message. but that moment obama said this is a legal ib you and i will have midlevel functionaries deal with. it do you think putin will look less manly than the chinese? it is not going to happen. now as long as he is in moscow there is not much to be done. if he makes his way from moscow to latin america, all bets are off. >> even you, andy, who have some weird homo-erotic attachment to snowden, you have to admit he is hurting this country. if you were president yo
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
, the obama administration wants to intimidate whistle blowers. the more edward snowden can have a normalized and free life, the more it will let other whistle blowers come forward. >> again, if you ever want that platform, cash in is waiting, ready, willing and able to hear what you're ready to break. >> thanks, eric. >>> coming up, how the health care website being temporarily down can lift america back up for good. i'll explain. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. >>> time for what do i need to know for next week. you're first. >> i say we've been talking about health care. take a look at acadia health care. it's a psychiatric owner of facilities. been a study increase in earnings this last quarter. above 75%. >> very good. how about you jonathan? >> interest rates are higher this year, eric and it's helping the financial stocks, including a canadian life insurance company. strong on the charts, not widely owned. i'm looking to add to it. >> interesting. great calls lately, guys. thank you very much. that's it for
to company out -- >> snowden being the leaker. >> edward snowden being the leaker. we were talking about domestic spying and snooping on americans. here you have purely foreign intelligence and suddenly that's a crime as well. it's kind of an indication of the moving goal post of this debate. >> there's a great danger here domestically of the political backlash. think feinstein's trying to ward it off -- patrick leahy, there's sensenbrenner in the house, there's -- >> especially pushing legislation to stop the nsa from data collection. to let the aclu basically argue why certain things shouldn't be done, and to really handcuff our intelligence services the way that happened in the 1970s which indirectly led up to our failures that led to 9/11. >> how big a danger is that, mary? >> well, it's -- i think it's possible that, you know, you're going to get the momentum but it's incredibly naive. i mean, you know, as if -- if the u.s. stops doing this, then it won't be happening anymore. if the u.s. stops doing it, then the only ones doing it will be the chinese, the russians. you know, the br
contractor, edward snowden. >> the national security agency took the unusual step thursday of denying a report that'ves drop on the vatican phone calls and may have tapped in on pope francis before he was elected. what are you making up? is this a church, state issue? >> you got in on the consistent, the ones that depict the new pope, john? >> who knows. saved a lot of money. those guys have not done anything that was not known to the national security council and the white house and the idea of blaming these guys who are doing the job they were signed to do and oh my goodness, for miss feinstein, that there's a touch of hypocrisy here. >> there's a lot of outrage. i'm with clapper on this issue as well. i mean, i think because of the technological advances and the fact that we can now, you know, look in on people's cell phones, that you know, there has to be some more guidelines brought into this thing. but overall, friends spy on friends, it's not going to stop. >> what do you think of that? >> i think, well, i'm not enough people, clearly. there's no doubt that this has been g
n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggests that the nation's biggest tech companies are being breached, too. and as far as we know, it's all legal. is that right, tom? >> well, that's being debated. and i'm not a lawyer. so i sort of deal with things on a dumbed down level. gwen: ok. do that. >> there's one rule that basically underlies all the law here. which is you can't spy on americans without a court order. gwen: right. >> but apparently you can spy on foreigners. and that's what these latest rounds of disclosures have involved. whether it's spying on angela merkel or in this case the n.s.a. found a way to intercept the data as it was transiting through data links into data centers that were held by google and yahoo in europe. so the argument would seem to be, the legal argument would seem to be because those data centers are in europe, they're not -- they can assume they're not american data. therefore, it was legal to go in. however, the data companies, google and yahoo, are absolutely furious about this. for various reasons. one of them is that their reputations have n
an issue since edward snowden and the nsa who are these contractors getting into our databases it was a focus of kathleen sebelius' testimony, you know, last week. they were kind of -- they were going after her on some of the security flaws that they thought might be. >> i was at that hearing. she didn't say gee we knew qssi had security issues and there was this huge problem last june. i don't remember her saying that at the hearing. i never remember hearing her despite of the fact they had security flaws decided they would be the good person to fix it it? >> you you are right. they are reacting to these issues as they come up. it doesn't seem as if there is any. >> it seems so basic to me that you don't hire a company -- there are some companies that you can get let's not get one under investigation for swindling the british or qssi who had some sort of security lapse last summer. i'm taking the last one on that. never dull moment. >>> straight ahead hundreds of thousands of americans dropped. now they need new insurance plans. that is not an easy process. self-employed busin
accounts much the leaker behind all of these is edward snowden hiding out in russia and the journalist who helped bring it to the world's attention is glen greenwald who spoke with me said that the president has not been honest with the american people. listen. >> i think he was informed but chose to tell the public things that he knew to be false. this is really been the nub of the story from the very beginning is top nsa officials lied to the congress about what nsa does with america's communication. and president obama has repeatedly mislead the public by claiming that the nsa does not invade the content of our communications when in fact without warrants the nsa is frequently monitoring the communication of american citizens. >> not everyone sees it this way. joining me now from los angeles, fox news contributor, rick grenell the former spokesman to the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. rick, thanks for joining us. i interviewed glen greenwald. the reason we brought him on cashing in which i'm going to air it tomorrow morning on the fox news channel. the reason why i brought him on is becaus
edward snowden is pleading for international support tonight to stop what he calls america's persecution of him. a german lawmaker flew to moscow to visit the former nsa contractor who was granted asylum in russia after leaking the nsa's domestic spying programs. the lawmaker was there to discuss the recent reports also that the u.s. is also spying on germany including chancellor angela merkel. why there, the lawmaker says snowden gave him a letter in which he asks the united states to stop treating him like a traitor. the u.s. has not responded. >>> okay. call it the other push to go green. as the movement to legalize marijuana gains steam, there's one aspect of the debate that may not be getting enough attention. >> we're talking about the impact to our environment. our investigative reporter traveled across the state to expose the damage done by many pot growers. >> unfortunately, this is becoming a common practice. we found that many growers are trespassing on to national parks and tribal land. they are using highly toxic pesticides to grow pot. the effects are real and deadly. flyin
edwards snowden hired by an undisclosed russian internet company the former us intelligence contractors steady drip of leaks about the national security agency. again became aggression this past week with our revelations about the tap phones of thirty five world leaders patrolling of all the personal data. more than sixty million citizens of france and spain. and it's drawn a lot of anger. goodbye friend that we were tonight he writes the host of prominent intellectuals in the site including the former german chancellor willy bronze calls headline that says we need a more realistic basis for the us german relationship. this is up a manifesto that said the new flag press meet him yet making payments made to a lean and fit something in the tank this weekend when he liked about anything and when you isn't really helping families helping families we just got its own conversation by saying no to on of those who were listening to us so he was going to use it in effect the seventies because he preferred to talk to the details but he knew it takes the stance of this nothing new i needed it. i'm
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and be
are questioning the quality of background checks. the edward snowden case, of course, raises some any questions. and so does the wikileaks. just yesterday we learned that the department of justice has joined a lawsuit against a company called united states investigations services, commonly known as usis. this is a company that formed about 45% of the background investigations that are contracted out by the office of personnel management. according to this lawsuit, usis engaged in a practice that company insiders referred to as dumping. some refer to as flushing. under this alleged scam they would send investigations back to the office of personnel management even though they had not gone through the full review process. through this dumping, usis maximized its profits. many national security experts have long argued the security clearance process is antiquated and in need of modernization. given recent events i think we have to ask whether the system is fundamentally flawed. we should also be mindful for many years both congress and the federal agencies were concerned about the backlog of secur
of all the questions that have been raised in this includes that of edward snowden and what should give us any faith in this current history. >> i appreciate the question. and i certainly understand it based upon the reports and as you mentioned, senator, he contained very serious allegations of contract fraud arising out of 2010 and 2011 and we have been aware of these allegations since the complaint was filed in july 2011 and have been working closely with the doj to implement changes that would address this nature would not continue in this includes what the allegations could be. we understand that the contractors have an obligation to conduct their own investigations. in this includes our own quality reviews of the investigations and what the allegation is here is to move cases more quickly and that is a real problem, obviously with the allegations that are substantiated because this includes quality review and it's a real problem because we rely upon their quality reviews in order for us to be able to move the investigation along more quickly and we like them to capture the issue a
have denied the charges against them. >>> the u.s. isn't showing any leniency toward edward snowden after he pleaded for international help and asking for the u.s. to drop spying charges against him. a german lawmaker released the letter friday following a meeting with snowden in russia. snowden said he would like to testify before congress and he would be willing to help officials in germany investigate alleged u.s. spying there. >>> honda is recalling more an 300,000 odyssey minivans to fix a problem that can cause the vehicle to break without warning. it affects the 2007 and 2008 model years. honda said the fix won't be available until next spring so it's mailing out instructions telling owners how they should drive to prevent the problem from occurring. >>> a scare for denver nuggets fans at friday night's home opener and it wasn't just the score against the trail blazers. before the game the mascot rocky was lowered from the ceiling of the pepsi center to the floor for player introductions. the fans cheered and spotlight on him but one problem. rocky was apparently unconscious
of this discussion is the source of many of these nsa disclosures, edward snowden, he's appealing to washington to stop treating him like a traitor. he made the appeal in a letter that he gave to a german politician who visited him in moscow. what do you think of snowden's request here? >> i think we've had a very important debate that's been kindled by these leaks. but i have little sympathy for mr. snowden. he's done enormous damage to the country. if he were a man of conscience as he claims to be, he would have in a civil disobedience way, face the music here at home. but he fled to those authoritarian regimes that care nothing about privacy. part of what he is doing is designed more to inflict damage on the united states than to make a cause out of privacy. >> part of that here, snowden offering to testify in germany about american eavesdropping methods. if germany grants him asylum there, what would you do to stop that? >> i hope germany won't make that decision. germany understands just as we do that we can't have people working within our intelligence community or people working within t
conference to hear what comes to stand some of them had to say about his meeting with edward snowdon and his letter to the german government. snowden potentially speak to german investigators or politicians or even travel to germany to be interviewed for stand up to envisage coming to gemini is a guaranteed he would often with the secure in germany or in the comparable country and that's the guise of not dying from orange dog sees god is. snowdon told the green party politician he would prefer to testify in russia. president putin has granted him asylum there. as long as he keeps a low political profile. so could this mean german asylum for the former intelligence analyst. earlier this year the german interior ministry said he did not fulfill conditions required for an asylum application. but his revelations about the nsa eavesdropping on chancellor medical cellphone me working is deeper than the porch off place to use the messages mr sneddon wants to give us information and had something to tell us that we are happy to hear it all through all the information and facts we can get on to a wom
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)